Excuse Me, Sir…

Have you ever been at a family reunion, and your Uncle Howard’s zipper is gaping open, but everyone is failing to point it out to him, even you? I have. Now, that was not necessarily the same situation I was in, but I have experienced many other times that have gotten me to thinking about what I should have done, or will do. Most people, I assume, would glance at someone at the wrong place, at the wrong time. Thus, he/she would be suddenly aware of the woman blushing violently, while chattering away like a news reporter, to a very handsome man she is clearly more than interested in. Plus, she has a great wad of parsley stuck between her protruding fore-teeth. A wave of lamentation sweeps over you, and you feel ultimately compunctious for the woman. Yet, you have no idea what to do. I would, somewhat bluntly, walk over to the woman, smiling of course, and whisper in her ear that she has something in her teeth. While doing all this, I would desperately be hoping that she is a kind-befriending person, who will overly appreciate the advice I will have provided her. Now, there are many factors that might influence such an instance. If I were at the age I am now, 15, and saw that woman with the piece of parsley in her mouth, and assume she was 38 years old, I could not simply waltz up to her and casually say she has a green thing in her mouth. Unfortunately, because I being 15, and she being more than twice my age, that action would be considered quite improper. Thus, a question of ‘what to do?’ remains intact. I would resolve the conflict, by issuing an adult to perform my “childish task.” Therefore, it would be much more proper. However, if it were a person my age, I would graciously do the deed myself. A couple of Dimond students feel that telling the person would be an ideal thing to do. Freshman Maya Abdallah says, “I’d tell them, but secretly.” In agreement, Senior Coleman Weiss says about seeing a person with a piece of toilet paper stuck to their shoe, “[I’d] tap them on the shoulder and point to their shoe.” I believe telling someone, whether it be a best friend or a stranger, that they have a temporary, embarrassing attribute is an incredibly kind gesture. That person would be able to be aware of something that could have definitely made their day an absolute disaster. I am almost 99.9999 percent positive that any human being would be supremely appreciative of having you or I save them from any more embarrassment, than what their life already brings them. Remember, the next time you see someone with their zipper gaping open, a piece of toilet paper stuck to their shoe or a huge hunk of parsley in their mouth, I suggest you let them know. You might save them embarrassment and remorse as well as, just maybe, making a new friend.